My Ethical Position Regarding Non-Human Life

My Ethical Position Regarding Non-Human Life

This paper defends my utilitarian perspective of moral standing and moral duties. I argue that the ultimate criterion for moral standing is the ability to experience pain since it is the only element that is intrinsically bad. Moral agents have a responsibility to minimize the average amount of pain experienced by all sentient beings.

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Thoughts on Work, Leisure, and Fulfillment

Thoughts on Work, Leisure, and Fulfillment

This passage declares that fulfillment derives from purpose, which is acquired through the long-term pursuit of self-improvement. Modern capitalism presents two primary devices that distract us from (and distort our notions of) meaningful work – entertainment and wage labor. Through the contemplation of work and leisure, this passage explores the nature of labor, exploitation, and fulfillment.

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The Impacts of Reaganomics on the American Working Class

The Impacts of Reaganomics on the American Working Class

This paper contrasts the supply-side economic theory of Reaganomics to the Keynesian thought of the mid-twentieth century. Keeping in mind the many factors influencing the economy over the last century, this essay compares each theory’s impact on the American lower and middle classes.

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A Brief History of the Pentagon

A Brief History of the Pentagon

This article reflects on the development of the Department of Defense and the military-industrial complex, alongside the impacts of America’s permanent wartime economy throughout the twentieth century.  This essay then examines the prospects of transitioning focus to federal social spending, alongside the social, political, and economic ramifications of such reform.

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Madison’s Fear of Pure Democracy

Madison’s Fear of Pure Democracy

Methods to balance democracy and authority were among the first debates of American politics. James Madison proposed a system of modest popular participation alongside a clearly defined ruling class. The numerous obstacles to popular participation in the modern American government reflect Madison’s fear of pure democracy. This passage deliberates the nature of democracy and authority to understand these mechanisms and assess their moral validity.

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