Deliberating Ethical Utility Distribution in a Populous Society

Deliberating Ethical Utility Distribution in a Populous Society

This paper addresses the mere addition paradox, as outlined in Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons (1984). The predicament centers around the fallacious “Repugnant Conclusion” that prevents utilitarian social theorists from discovering a consistent theory of utility distribution. After reviewing how philosophers arrive at the Repugnant Conclusion, this article explores the logical methods to interpret Parfit’s work and the central dilemmas of population ethics.

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Dilemmas of Utilitarianism

Dilemmas of Utilitarianism

This paper analyzes historical disagreements among utilitarians, specifically regarding justice and political theory. Utilitarians hold varying perspectives on the existence of universal rules that maximize utility, and whether total or average utility should be maximized. After reviewing centuries of discourse, this paper defends the author’s thoughts on utilitarianism.

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The Significance of Locke’s Political Philosophy

The Significance of Locke’s Political Philosophy

This paper analyzes the historical significance of John Locke’s political philosophy, specifically regarding the American Revolution. The historical analysis of absolutism, natural rights, and political philosophy is vital to understanding the modern context of these concepts and their reflections in contemporary governments. 

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Madison’s Fear of Pure Democracy

Madison’s Fear of Pure Democracy

Methods to balance democracy and authority were among the first debates of American politics. James Madison proposed a system of modest popular participation alongside a clearly defined ruling class. The numerous obstacles to popular participation in the modern American government reflect Madison’s fear of pure democracy. This passage deliberates the nature of democracy and authority to understand these mechanisms and assess their moral validity.

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